Plane

Traveling Space Museum, Inc.

"We bring the adventure of space to you."

The Day Long "Space Day" Event

"Space Day" is the award-winning program presented by the Traveling Space Museum, Inc. that brings full–scale and interactive space themed exhibits to schools. The brainchild of TSM’s president, Ivor Dawson in 1998, a "Space Day" combines the interactivity of a space camp and the thrill of a theme park and, in effect, brings the space museum field trip to students in neighborhood schools. TSM does this program all across the country.

Reminiscent of a traveling circus coming to town, TSM trucks drive into a school parking lot and exhibits are quickly off loaded and set up at designated sites on campus the day before the event. Ten or more different exhibits are set up. Local science groups are also encouraged to display exhibits so that the typical "Space Day" has fifteen or more exhibits.

Traveling Space Museum Inc., a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit, does all the planning and logistics. This frees a school’s staff from the headaches inherent in the planning of large field trips.

Bringing a space museum to a school is a more efficient and cheaper than a field trip involving a few hundred students. On Space Day, students spend more time having fun learning about space than they would on a typical field trip. And there is no limit as to how many students can attend.


The Traveling Space Museum is the only group that brings a full–motion flight simulator and a real jet plane to neighborhood schools.








Specializing in the use of full–scale simulators as teaching tools, TSM’s many interactive attractions include the only full–motion flight simulator and the only jet aircraft to visit schools regularly. Interactivity is key as students are invited to climb in and work real hardware that an astronaut would use. Inside the simulators, the students are completely immersed in the experience. Many students are introduced to lab top computers, computerized microscopes, heart monitors, glove boxes, CB radios and other "high—tech" hardware. Operating the hardware teaches relevancy and that understanding is what makes learning fun! The typical museum wouldn’t allow students to touch the exhibits much less climb inside them.

The exhibit presentations are all age appropriate and meet California and National Science Content Standards.

The Odyssey SpaceLab and our world famous space toilet simulation.

Odyssey IV Mobile SpaceLab
TSM’s ultimate simulation is the Odyssey IV Mobile SpaceLab. The Odyssey is a 16 foot–long, full–scale replica of a space laboratory module that would be found as a part of the International Space Station. The Odyssey SpaceLab contains 7 different workstations ––Data Retrieval, Communications, Hydroponics, BioMed, Life Sciences, Life–Support and Isolation. Several workstations are equipped with tiny TV cameras and flat–screen video monitors that are wired to remote desktop "Mission Control" consoles. The result is a sophisticated video conferencing system that makes the Odyssey the ultimate teaching tool. More fun than a video game, students on–board the Odyssey learn the use of space age hardware such as lap–top computers, robotic arms, glove boxes, joy–sticks, radio headsets and video conferencing equipment just to name a few. The Odyssey could very well be the ultimate learning experience for students.








THE TSM MISSION:
Our mission is to teach general science to students of all ages using methods that are comprehensive, interactive and always fun.

Lunar Utility Vehicle and Mission Control both work like the real thing.

Homeroom teachers are encouraged to stay with their classes. TSM demonstrators explain their exhibits and answer all questions. This approach allows teachers to enjoy the experience along with their students. Space Day is usually a holiday for the regular teachers.

A master schedule is generated and copies given to each homeroom teacher. Each teacher knows exactly where their class is supposed to be at any given time on that day, With five to ten minutes to travel to the next attraction, a typical class should see about two exhibits an hour. Factoring in lunch and exercise breaks, the entire student body should have seen all the exhibits in a five to six hour day

Each exhibit is accompanied by a lecture that lasts about twenty minutes. Depending on the size of the student population, one, two or even three classes at a time can tour the same exhibit while the entire school is in motion. The uniqueness of the schedule and anticipation of the day’s events provides much of the excitement and the energy. On a typical Space Day, students are busy operating robots, exploring a space laboratory module, putting on space suits or climbing inside "the world’s smallest jet." How astronauts go to the bathroom is instantly demonstrated when students sit on our space shuttle toilet simulation. Space toys, remote control rovers are also favorite exhibits along with the chance to eat space food or handle a meteorite! Over the course of a school day, more students will see many more exhibits then what they would see at a typical museum.

Customize Your Space Day
Tell us what your students are learning and us what you would like them to know. Customize your Space Day and have it your way! And don’t forget to tell everyone to bring their cameras!

Kids have fun inside a ’captured UFO’ and space suits.

Wondering how realistic TSM’s simulators are and will older students like them? Just ask former astronauts Gordon Fullerton and Leroy Chiao. They had a blast!

Contact: Ivor Dawson, President Traveling Space Museum, Inc. www.travelingspacemuseum.org 323.903.5259